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The easiest way to help your child enjoy a diverse diet

Our Mix-In is recommended for daily use when your baby is ready to start complementary feeding and is a great way to introduce SpoonfulOne to your baby.

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Mix-In • 6+ months

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FAQs

Developed by Kari Nadeau, MD, PhD, a globally recognised paediatric food allergy expert, SpoonfulOne is designed to help you conveniently include multiple food allergens into your child’s diet, and is based on landmark research4-10 as well as proprietary studies.1-3

Each product includes a spoonful of our Foundational Food Blend – small amounts of peanuts, milk, shellfish (shrimp), tree nuts (almond, cashew, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, and walnut), egg, fish (cod and salmon), grains (wheat and oat), soy, and sesame. Each serving includes foods responsible for over 90% of food allergies.11-14


It is recommended to start your baby on SpoonfulOne at 6 months of age. Once you start it is important that you continue to give SpoonfulOne to your child daily until your child has a varied diet, which could be around 2 years of age.


Director of the Sean N. Parker Center for Allergy and Asthma Research at Stanford University’s School of Medicine, Stanford CA, USA.

SpoonfulOne is recommended to be given to healthy babies 6 months of age and onwards, together with the introduction of complementary feeding (when babies start having solid foods), but not before 4 months of age.

Important Note: Do not give SpoonfulOne if your baby has a known food allergy to any of the ingredients. It is recommended to give SpoonfulOne together with complementary feeding from 6 months of age. Consult your healthcare professional if you have concerns about introducing SpoonfulOne, or if your baby has eczema. In case of any allergic reaction to the product, stop SpoonfulOne and seek medical assistance without delay.

SpoonfulOne products were designed to be started in infancy and enjoyed through toddlerhood. Our Mix-In is specially designed to be given to babies starting as early as 6 months of age, once they have begun complementary feeding.

When your baby is ready, at around 6 months old, but not before 4 months, you can start to introduce a variety of solid foods, while continuing to breastfeed.15-16

Signs showing that your baby is ready to start eating solid foods include:15-16

  • Your baby has good head and neck control and can sit upright when supported
  • Your baby shows an interest in food and reaches out for your food
  • Your baby opens his/her mouth when offered food on a spoon

These signs happen at different times for different babies.



Food allergens should be introduced as soon as your baby is starting on complementary foods and no later than within the first 12 months of age. If other members of the family have food allergies, it is still important to introduce that food to your baby whilst keeping the other family members safe. For further guidance you may want to consult your healthcare professional before use.

When introducing SpoonfulOne for the first time, it is recommended to use it together with a food your baby has been introduced to earlier and tolerated well. Do it in the beginning of the day so that you can watch your baby and easily respond to any potential reactions. Once SpoonfulOne (or other food allergens) has been introduced it is important that you continue to give SpoonfulOne to your child daily until your child has a varied diet which could be around 2 years of age.


Food allergens should be introduced at around the age of 6 months as part of the complementary diet and preferably not later than 12 months of age. If your baby is within that age range, it’s a great time to start SpoonfulOne. As you introduce your baby to complementary feeding, SpoonfulOne can help provide a comprehensive, convenient way to include the most common food allergens

Food allergies are a growing health concern17. But leading research shows that early and regular dietary exposure to foods like peanut may reduce the risk of a child developing an allergy to that food.4-10


Each SpoonfulOne product includes a spoonful of our Foundational Food Blend – carefully portioned (at least 30 mg of each food protein) servings of peanuts, milk, shellfish (shrimp), tree nuts (almond, cashew, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, and walnut), egg, fish (cod and salmon), grains (wheat and oat), soy, and sesame.

It is recommended to start your baby on SpoonfulOne at 6 months of age. Once you start it is important that you continue to give SpoonfulOne to your child daily until your child has a varied diet, which could be around 2 years of age.


Once you start it is important that you continue to give SpoonfulOne to your child daily until your child has a varied diet, which could be around 2 years of age. Scientific studies showed that early, consistent dietary exposures for 3-5 years resulted in significant reductions in risk of food allergy development.5,7-10

The Asia Pacific Association of Pediatric Allergy, Respirology and Immunology (APAPARI)18, Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS)19 and the British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology20 also recommend a diverse range of complementary foods, including potential allergens, as early as 6 months of age. The Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy (ASCIA)21 also advise including common allergy-causing foods when introducing solid foods, by 12 months of age in an age-appropriate form. The American Academy of Pediatrics (APA)22 have stated that it is safe to start multiple foods at once.

All SpoonfulOne products contain a spoonful of our proprietary Foundational Food Blend which covers the food groups responsible for over 90% of food allergies11-14. Our Foundational Food Blend includes small amounts of peanuts, milk, shellfish (shrimp), tree nuts (almond, cashew, hazelnut, pecan, pistachio, and walnut), egg, fish (cod and salmon), grains (wheat and oat), soy, and sesame.


We’ve designed SpoonfulOne products to be stored at room temperature, so you can keep them wherever is most convenient for you: your kitchen counter, your pantry, or in your child’s nappy bag when you are on the go!

SpoonfulOne was designed to support consistent daily use. Miss a day here or there? Aim to resume SpoonfulOne and keep a consistent routine.

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1. Data on file. Before Brands, Inc 2019.

2. Holl J L, et al. A randomized trial of the acceptability of a daily multi-allergen food supplement for infants. Pediat Allergy Immunol, 2020; 31:418-420. doi:10.1111/ pai.13223

3. Data on file. Before Brands, Inc 2019.

4. Du Toit, et al. LEAP Study Team. Randomized trial of peanut consumption in infants at risk for peanut allergy. N Engl J Med. 2015;372(9):803-813.

5. Du Toit G, et al; LEAP-ON Study Team. Effect of Avoidance on Peanut Allergy after Early Peanut Consumption. N Engl J Med 2016;374(15):1435-1443.

6. Perkin MR, et al; EAT Study Team. Randomized Trial of Introduction of Allergenic Foods in Breast-Fed Infants. N Engl J Med 2016;374(18):1733-1743.

7. Natsume O, et al; PETIT Study Team. Two-step egg introduction for prevention of egg allergy in high-risk infants with eczema (PETIT): a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet 2017;389:276-286.

8. Roduit C, et al; PASTURE study group. Increased food diversity in the first year of life is inversely associated with allergic diseases. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2014;133(4):1056-1064.

9. Tran MM, et al; CHILD Study Investigators. Timing of food introduction and development of food sensitization in a prospective birth cohort. Pediatr Allergy Immunol 2017;28(5):471-477.

10. Venter C, et al. Different measures of dietary diversity during infancy and the association with childhood food allergy in a UK birth control study. J Allergy Clin Immunol 2020;8(6):2017-2026.

11. Gupta RS, et al. The public health impact of parent-reported childhood food allergies in the United States. Pediatrics. 2018;142(6):e20181235.

12. Nwaru BI, et al., on behalf of the EAACI Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Guidelines Group. Prevalence of common food allergies in Europe: A systematic review and meta-analysis. Allergy 2014; 69 :992-1007.

13. Australian Institute of Food Safety. 2019. 10 Most Common Food Allergies in Australia. Available at: https://www.foodsafety.com.au/blog/top-10-most-common-food-allergies Accessed 31 August 2020.

14. Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. 2019. Food Allergy. Available at:https://allergy.org.au/patients/food-allergy/food-allergy Accessed 31 August 2020.

15. Fewtrell M et al. Complementary Feeding: A Position Paper by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition (ESPGHAN) Committee on Nutrition. JPGN 2017;64:119-132

16. Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. 2019. ASCIA Information on how to introduce solid foods to babies for allergy prevention. Available at: https://www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention/ascia-how-to-introduce-solid-foods-to-babies Accessed 31 August 2020.

17. Prescott S, et al. A global survey of changing patterns in food allergy burden in children. World Allergy Organ J 2013;6:21

18. Tham EH, et al. Early introduction of allergenic foods for the prevention of food allergy from an Asian perspective – An Asia Pacific Association of Pediatric Allergy, Respirology & Immunology (APARIRI) consensus statement. Pediatr Allergy Immunol. 2018;29(1):18-27.

19. Canadian Paediatric Society. 2020. Caring for kids : Information for parents from Canada’s paediatricians. https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/healthy_eating_for_children. Accessed June 16, 2019

20. The British Society for Allergy & Clinical Immunology. (2018). Infant feeding and allergy prevention. Available at: https://www.bsaci.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/pdf_Early-feeding-guidance-for-HCPs-2.pdf Accessed August 20, 2020

21. Australasian Society of Clinical Immunology and Allergy. 2016. Guidelines for infant feeding and allergy prevention. Available at: https://allergy.org.au/hp/papers/infant-feeding-and-allergy-prevention Accessed August 20, 2020

22. American Academy of Pediatrics. AAP Clinical report highlights early introduction of peanut-based foods to prevent allergies. March 18, 2019. https://www.aap.org/en-us/about-the-aap/aap-press-room/Pages/AAP-Clinical-Report-Highlights-Early-Introduction-of-Peanut-Based-Foods-to-Prevent-Allergies.aspx. Accessed June 10, 2019.

Important Note: Do not give SpoonfulOne if your baby has a known food allergy to any of the ingredients. It is recommended to give SpoonfulOne together with complementary feeding from 6 months of age. Consult your healthcare professional if you have concerns about introducing SpoonfulOne, or if your baby has eczema. In case of any allergic reaction to the product, stop SpoonfulOne and seek medical assistance without delay.

Australia only: We recommend to give SpoonfulOne to your baby as a convenient way to include food allergens daily, once common allergy causing foods have been introduced into your baby’s diet.

Australia only: For advice on how to introduce common allergy causing foods refer to ASCIA guidance on ‘How to introduce solids foods for allergy prevention (https://www.allergy.org.au/patients/allergy-prevention/ascia-how-to-introduce-solid-foods-to-babies).